CPI Launches Innovative Health Financing Pilot Project in Southeastern Myanmar

21 November 2018

As Myanmar’s health system evolves and health providers work towards the achievement of Universal Health Coverage by 2030, securing adequate financing remains an enduring challenge. This is particularly true for ethnic health organizations that, despite providing the first line of health services to hundreds of thousands of people in conflict-affected, hard-to-reach and under served areas of Myanmar, have not received to date any direct financing from the Government of Myanmar. Community Partners International (CPI) is working with two ethnic health organizations in Southeastern Myanmar on a pilot project to model a new approach to health financing in Myanmar: Strategic Purchasing of health services. The intention for this pilot is to inform and guide future financing agreements, and help ethnic health service providers to secure broad, reliable and long-term financing sources to support their lifesaving work.

On June 23 and 24, 2018, representatives of CPI, the Karen Department of Health and Welfare (KDHW) and the Health Department of the Border Guard Force (HD-BGF) met in Hpa-An to sign the contract for the Strategic Purchasing pilot project. This is the first ever project of its kind with ethnic health organizations in Myanmar. Under this innovative pilot, CPI will invest in a package of primary and public health services to be provided to approximately 10,000 people living in communities around four clinics in Southeastern Myanmar operated by KDHW and HD-BGF. KDHW and HD-BGF will provide the services, organize the logistics and undertake monitoring. From this monitoring, combined with service level data and additional on-site verification, CPI will generate the evidence to evaluate whether the services have been delivered as agreed in the contract.

This model of strategic purchasing gives ethnic health organizations significantly more autonomy than under more traditional granting mechanisms. It empowers them to deploy funds and resources flexibly, and to adjust their approach as the context changes, so that they can achieve service delivery objectives efficiently and effectively.
It encourages better integration between ethnic health providers in resource-constrained and hard-to-reach contexts. With more decision-making power over how funds are used, they can work together to holistically identify needs and priorities, and coordinate the delivery of health services to best meet community needs.

It also generates evidence of the return on investment for both ethnic health providers and donors. The data gathered during implementation monitoring will provide detailed insight into the positive impact on health outcomes achieved with each investment. This evidence will inform more rational, justified, and efficient decisions on spending, resource allocation and health systems strengthening.

What’s more, it’s scalable. The Myanmar government expressly included the intention to purchase services from ethnic health organizations in the National Health Plan, 2017-2021. Understanding how purchasing from EHOs can work, including the challenges and opportunities it presents, can (and should) feed directly into national health policy.

If successful, the project can provide a blueprint for future financing agreements between ethnic health providers and the Government of Myanmar. This would represent an important step forward in aligning health services and systems while maintaining the autonomy of ethnic health providers, and active cooperation between these stakeholders, all of which will be crucial in the shared goal to achieve health for all in Myanmar.

As this Strategic Purchasing pilot project moves forward, CPI will be producing regular Learning Briefs and hosting seminars to inform and engage interested parties with progress and lessons learned.

This initiative is funded as part of CPI’s ‘Better Health Together’ project supported by the Swiss Agency for Development & Cooperation (SDC) and the Three Millennium Development Goal (3MDG) Fund.

 

 

 

 

 

As Myanmar’s health system evolves and health providers work towards the achievement of Universal Health Coverage by 2030, securing adequate financing remains an enduring challenge. This is particularly true for ethnic health organizations that, despite providing the first line of health services to hundreds of thousands of people in conflict-affected, hard-to-reach and underserved areas of Myanmar, have not received to date any direct financing from the Government of Myanmar. Community Partners International (CPI) is working with two ethnic health organizations in Southeastern Myanmar on a pilot project to model a new approach to health financing in Myanmar: Strategic Purchasing of health services. The intention for this pilot is to inform and guide future financing agreements, and help ethnic health service providers to secure broad, reliable and long-term financing sources to support their lifesaving work.

On June 23 and 24, 2018, representatives of CPI, the Karen Department of Health and Welfare (KDHW) and the Health Department of the Border Guard Force (HD-BGF) met in Hpa-An to sign the contract for the Strategic Purchasing pilot project. This is the first ever project of its kind with ethnic health organizations in Myanmar. Under this innovative pilot, CPI will invest in a package of primary and public health services to be provided to approximately 10,000 people living in communities around four clinics in Southeastern Myanmar operated by KDHW and HD-BGF. KDHW and HD-BGF will provide the services, organize the logistics and undertake monitoring. From this monitoring, combined with service level data and additional on-site verification, CPI will generate the evidence to evaluate whether the services have been delivered as agreed in the contract.

This model of strategic purchasing gives ethnic health organizations significantly more autonomy than under more traditional granting mechanisms. It empowers them to deploy funds and resources flexibly, and to adjust their approach as the context changes, so that they can achieve service delivery objectives efficiently and effectively.
It encourages better integration between ethnic health providers in resource-constrained and hard-to-reach contexts. With more decision-making power over how funds are used, they can work together to holistically identify needs and priorities, and coordinate the delivery of health services to best meet community needs.

It also generates evidence of the return on investment for both ethnic health providers and donors. The data gathered during implementation monitoring will provide detailed insight into the positive impact on health outcomes achieved with each investment. This evidence will inform more rational, justified, and efficient decisions on spending, resource allocation and health systems strengthening.

What’s more, it’s scalable. The Myanmar government expressly included the intention to purchase services from ethnic health organizations in the National Health Plan, 2017-2021. Understanding how purchasing from EHOs can work, including the challenges and opportunities it presents, can (and should) feed directly into national health policy.

If successful, the project can provide a blueprint for future financing agreements between ethnic health providers and the Government of Myanmar. This would represent an important step forward in aligning health services and systems while maintaining the autonomy of ethnic health providers, and active cooperation between these stakeholders, all of which will be crucial in the shared goal to achieve health for all in Myanmar.

As this Strategic Purchasing pilot project moves forward, CPI will be producing regular Learning Briefs and hosting seminars to inform and engage interested parties with progress and lessons learned.

This initiative is funded as part of CPI’s ‘Better Health Together’ project supported by the Swiss Agency for Development & Cooperation (SDC) and the Three Millennium Development Goal (3MDG) Fund.

 

 

ျမန္မာႏုိင္ငံအေရွ႕ေတာင္ပုိင္းတြင္ လူထုပုိမုိအားေကာင္းလာေစရန္ ေငြေၾကးေထာက္ပံ့မႈ စီမံကိန္းအသစ္မွ ၅ သိန္းေက်ာ္ခန္႔ရွိ ေဒသခံမ်ားအတြက္အက်ိဳးျပဳႏိုုင္ရန္ ေမွ်ာ္မွန္း

အေမရိကန္ျပည္ေထာင္စုု၊ ႏိုုင္ငံတကာဖြံ႔ၿဖိဳးတိုုးတက္ေရးေအဂ်င္စီ USAID မွ ကူညီေထာက္ပံ့သည့္ ျမန္မာႏိုုင္ငံအေရွ႕ေတာင္ပိုုင္းရွိ လူထုုစြမ္းအားျမင့္မားလာေစေရးအတြက္ တိုးျမႇင့္လုပ္ေဆာင္ျခင္းစီမံကိန္း၏ အစိတ္အပိုုင္းျဖစ္သည့္ မြန္ႏွင့္ ကရင္ျပည္နယ္မွ မိတ္ဖက္အဖြဲ႔အစည္းတိုု႔အား အလြန္အေရးပါသည့္ဝန္ေဆာင္မႈမ်ားအတြက္ ရန္ပံုေငြေၾကး ခ်ီးျမႇင့္ခဲ့သည္။

၎ရန္ပံုေငြ ေထာက္ပံ့မႈရရွိၾကသည့္အဖြဲ႕မ်ားမွာ ကရင္က်န္းမာေရးႏွင့္ကယ္ဆယ္ေရးဌာန၊ ကရင္တိုင္းရင္းသားက်န္းမာေရးအဖဲြ႔မ်ားအစုအဖဲြ႔၊ Global Neighbors Thailand Foundation, Mae Tao Clinic ႏွင့္ မြန္အမ်ဳိးသားက်န္းမာေရးေကာ္မတီ (MNHC) တိုု႔ျဖစ္သည္။

ဤအလြန္အေရးပါသည့္ဝန္ေဆာင္မႈမ်ားအတြက္ ရန္ပံုေငြေထာက္ပံ့မႈမ်ားကိုု အားနည္းထိခိုက္လြယ္သည့္ လူ႔အသိုုင္းအဝိုုင္းမ်ားအတြက္အျပင္ ထိုုင္းျမန္မာနယ္စပ္တေလွ်ာက္ႏွင့္ ၊ လက္လွမ္းမွီရန္ ခက္ခဲေသာေဒသမ်ားရွိ ေနရပ္စြန္႔ခြာ တိန္းေရွာင္ရသူမ်ား၊ ကိုယ္ဝန္ေဆာင္အမ်ဳိးသမီးမ်ားႏွင့္ ၅ ႏွစ္ေအာက္ကေလးမ်ားတို႔အတြက္ မရွိမျဖစ္လိုုအပ္ေသာ က်န္းမာေရးေစာင့္ေရွာက္မႈဆိုင္ရာ လိုအပ္ခ်က္မ်ားကို အဓိကဦးစားေပးေဆာင္ ရြက္ေရးကို ဦးတည္ပါသည္။

ယခုကဲ့သို႔ ရန္ပံုေငြေထာက္ပံ့မႈေပးအပ္ျခင္းသည္ က်န္းမာေရး၊ ပညာေရး၊ အသက္ေမြးဝမ္းေက်ာင္းလုပ္ငန္း၊ ဂ်ဲန္ဒါ ႏွင့္ လူငယ္ေရးရာက႑မ်ားတြင္ စီမံကိန္းလုပ္ငန္းမ်ားျဖင့္ၾကားဝင္ေျဖရွင္းလုပ္ေဆာင္ျခင္းေၾကာင့္ ခန္႔မွန္းေျခလူဦးေရ ၅ သိန္းေက်ာ္တိုု႔က အက်ဳိးခံစားရမည္ဟုေမွ်ာ္လင့္လွ်က္ အလြန္အေရးပါသည့္ဝန္ေဆာင္မႈမ်ားအတြက္ ရန္ပံုေငြေၾကးေထာက္ပံ့ မႈစုုစုုေပါင္း ရွစ္ခု ေပးအပ္ခဲ့ပါသည္။

 

 

 

 

 

Padoh-Saw Eh K’Lu Sweh Oo

Director

Karen Department of Health

Central

 

 

Padoh-Saw Lah Hser

Secretary

Karen Department of Health

And Welfare

 Central

Padoh-Saw Diamond Khin

Health of Deputy Head

Karen Department of Health and

Welfare

Central

Padoh-Dr. Saw Marta

Professionalism

Senior executive officer

Karen Department of Health and Welfare

Hpa-An

Capital city of Karen state

 

 

 

 

Donations are always welcome. KDHW needs financial support – the department organizes funds and provides the health care for over 100,000 internally displaced people in Karen State inside Burma. Costs are covered by donations, small grants, and donated labour.  The department serves the public health by its efforts to reduce mortality due to malaria and trauma, including landmine injuries, and to reduce the spread of disease and infection. The Karen population would otherwise have no access to public health care at all, because the national government provides no services to the Karen. Your generosity is very much appreciated.

 

 

Conclusions

  • Karen Department of Health and Welfare (KDHW) has a history for long time and efforts in working in Karen state. However, at first to support health in communities and recently few years had an idea to given equal rights to education, jobs, credit land can benefit from as well as to contribute to prosperity with health in Karen state and activities expanding conduct. It’s have collaboration and partners to variety of situations form large teaching hospitals to health care facilities and professional experience from many place. Then building local capacity and strengthening health supply chain to updating national drugs regulation. Even though KDHW is an programme design and development of policies including the world health organization and also international email discussion forum on essential partners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As Myanmar’s health system evolves and health providers work towards the achievement of Universal Health Coverage by 2030, securing adequate financing remains an enduring challenge. This is particularly true for ethnic health organizations that, despite providing the first line of health services to hundreds of thousands of people in conflict-affected, hard-to-reach and underserved areas of Myanmar, have not received to date any direct financing from the Government of Myanmar. Community Partners International (CPI) is working with two ethnic health organizations in Southeastern Myanmar on a pilot project to model a new approach to health financing in Myanmar: Strategic Purchasing of health services. The intention for this pilot is to inform and guide future financing agreements, and help ethnic health service providers to secure broad, reliable and long-term financing sources to support their lifesaving work.

On June 23 and 24, 2018, representatives of CPI, the Karen Department of Health and Welfare (KDHW) and the Health Department of the Border Guard Force (HD-BGF) met in Hpa-An to sign the contract for the Strategic Purchasing pilot project. This is the first ever project of its kind with ethnic health organizations in Myanmar. Under this innovative pilot, CPI will invest in a package of primary and public health services to be provided to approximately 10,000 people living in communities around four clinics in Southeastern Myanmar operated by KDHW and HD-BGF. KDHW and HD-BGF will provide the services, organize the logistics and undertake monitoring. From this monitoring, combined with service level data and additional on-site verification, CPI will generate the evidence to evaluate whether the services have been delivered as agreed in the contract.

This model of strategic purchasing gives ethnic health organizations significantly more autonomy than under more traditional granting mechanisms. It empowers them to deploy funds and resources flexibly, and to adjust their approach as the context changes, so that they can achieve service delivery objectives efficiently and effectively.
It encourages better integration between ethnic health providers in resource-constrained and hard-to-reach contexts. With more decision-making power over how funds are used, they can work together to holistically identify needs and priorities, and coordinate the delivery of health services to best meet community needs.

It also generates evidence of the return on investment for both ethnic health providers and donors. The data gathered during implementation monitoring will provide detailed insight into the positive impact on health outcomes achieved with each investment. This evidence will inform more rational, justified, and efficient decisions on spending, resource allocation and health systems strengthening.

What’s more, it’s scalable. The Myanmar government expressly included the intention to purchase services from ethnic health organizations in the National Health Plan, 2017-2021. Understanding how purchasing from EHOs can work, including the challenges and opportunities it presents, can (and should) feed directly into national health policy.

If successful, the project can provide a blueprint for future financing agreements between ethnic health providers and the Government of Myanmar. This would represent an important step forward in aligning health services and systems while maintaining the autonomy of ethnic health providers, and active cooperation between these stakeholders, all of which will be crucial in the shared goal to achieve health for all in Myanmar.

As this Strategic Purchasing pilot project moves forward, CPI will be producing regular Learning Briefs and hosting seminars to inform and engage interested parties with progress and lessons learned.

This initiative is funded as part of CPI’s ‘Better Health Together’ project supported by the Swiss Agency for Development & Cooperation (SDC) and the Three Millennium Development Goal (3MDG) Fund.

 

 

ျမန္မာႏုိင္ငံအေရွ႕ေတာင္ပုိင္းတြင္ လူထုပုိမုိအားေကာင္းလာေစရန္ ေငြေၾကးေထာက္ပံ့မႈ စီမံကိန္းအသစ္မွ ၅ သိန္းေက်ာ္ခန္႔ရွိ ေဒသခံမ်ားအတြက္အက်ိဳးျပဳႏိုုင္ရန္ ေမွ်ာ္မွန္း

အေမရိကန္ျပည္ေထာင္စုု၊ ႏိုုင္ငံတကာဖြံ႔ၿဖိဳးတိုုးတက္ေရးေအဂ်င္စီ USAID မွ ကူညီေထာက္ပံ့သည့္ ျမန္မာႏိုုင္ငံအေရွ႕ေတာင္ပိုုင္းရွိ လူထုုစြမ္းအားျမင့္မားလာေစေရးအတြက္ တိုးျမႇင့္လုပ္ေဆာင္ျခင္းစီမံကိန္း၏ အစိတ္အပိုုင္းျဖစ္သည့္ မြန္ႏွင့္ ကရင္ျပည္နယ္မွ မိတ္ဖက္အဖြဲ႔အစည္းတိုု႔အား အလြန္အေရးပါသည့္ဝန္ေဆာင္မႈမ်ားအတြက္ ရန္ပံုေငြေၾကး ခ်ီးျမႇင့္ခဲ့သည္။

၎ရန္ပံုေငြ ေထာက္ပံ့မႈရရွိၾကသည့္အဖြဲ႕မ်ားမွာ ကရင္က်န္းမာေရးႏွင့္ကယ္ဆယ္ေရးဌာန၊ ကရင္တိုင္းရင္းသားက်န္းမာေရးအဖဲြ႔မ်ားအစုအဖဲြ႔၊ Global Neighbors Thailand Foundation, Mae Tao Clinic ႏွင့္ မြန္အမ်ဳိးသားက်န္းမာေရးေကာ္မတီ (MNHC) တိုု႔ျဖစ္သည္။

ဤအလြန္အေရးပါသည့္ဝန္ေဆာင္မႈမ်ားအတြက္ ရန္ပံုေငြေထာက္ပံ့မႈမ်ားကိုု အားနည္းထိခိုက္လြယ္သည့္ လူ႔အသိုုင္းအဝိုုင္းမ်ားအတြက္အျပင္ ထိုုင္းျမန္မာနယ္စပ္တေလွ်ာက္ႏွင့္ ၊ လက္လွမ္းမွီရန္ ခက္ခဲေသာေဒသမ်ားရွိ ေနရပ္စြန္႔ခြာ တိန္းေရွာင္ရသူမ်ား၊ ကိုယ္ဝန္ေဆာင္အမ်ဳိးသမီးမ်ားႏွင့္ ၅ ႏွစ္ေအာက္ကေလးမ်ားတို႔အတြက္ မရွိမျဖစ္လိုုအပ္ေသာ က်န္းမာေရးေစာင့္ေရွာက္မႈဆိုင္ရာ လိုအပ္ခ်က္မ်ားကို အဓိကဦးစားေပးေဆာင္ ရြက္ေရးကို ဦးတည္ပါသည္။

ယခုကဲ့သို႔ ရန္ပံုေငြေထာက္ပံ့မႈေပးအပ္ျခင္းသည္ က်န္းမာေရး၊ ပညာေရး၊ အသက္ေမြးဝမ္းေက်ာင္းလုပ္ငန္း၊ ဂ်ဲန္ဒါ ႏွင့္ လူငယ္ေရးရာက႑မ်ားတြင္ စီမံကိန္းလုပ္ငန္းမ်ားျဖင့္ၾကားဝင္ေျဖရွင္းလုပ္ေဆာင္ျခင္းေၾကာင့္ ခန္႔မွန္းေျခလူဦးေရ ၅ သိန္းေက်ာ္တိုု႔က အက်ဳိးခံစားရမည္ဟုေမွ်ာ္လင့္လွ်က္ အလြန္အေရးပါသည့္ဝန္ေဆာင္မႈမ်ားအတြက္ ရန္ပံုေငြေၾကးေထာက္ပံ့ မႈစုုစုုေပါင္း ရွစ္ခု ေပးအပ္ခဲ့ပါသည္။

 

 

 

 

 

Padoh-Saw Eh K’Lu Sweh Oo

Director

Karen Department of Health

Central

 

 

Padoh-Saw Lah Hser

Secretary

Karen Department of Health

And Welfare

 Central

Padoh-Saw Diamond Khin

Health of Deputy Head

Karen Department of Health and

Welfare

Central

Padoh-Dr. Saw Marta

Professionalism

Senior executive officer

Karen Department of Health and Welfare

Hpa-An

Capital city of Karen state

 

 

 

 

Donations are always welcome. KDHW needs financial support – the department organizes funds and provides the health care for over 100,000 internally displaced people in Karen State inside Burma. Costs are covered by donations, small grants, and donated labour.  The department serves the public health by its efforts to reduce mortality due to malaria and trauma, including landmine injuries, and to reduce the spread of disease and infection. The Karen population would otherwise have no access to public health care at all, because the national government provides no services to the Karen. Your generosity is very much appreciated.

 

 

Conclusions

  • Karen Department of Health and Welfare (KDHW) has a history for long time and efforts in working in Karen state. However, at first to support health in communities and recently few years had an idea to given equal rights to education, jobs, credit land can benefit from as well as to contribute to prosperity with health in Karen state and activities expanding conduct. It’s have collaboration and partners to variety of situations form large teaching hospitals to health care facilities and professional experience from many place. Then building local capacity and strengthening health supply chain to updating national drugs regulation. Even though KDHW is an programme design and development of policies including the world health organization and also international email discussion forum on essential partners.

 

 

 

 

 

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VHCs meeting at Southern Kawkareik

17 November 2017

KDHW held a Village Health Committee (VHC) meeting/workshop on Oct 10th, 2017 at Taw Nor Teaching hospital, Kawtareet township, Doo Pla Ya District. The purpose of the meeting was to raise the awareness to village health committee for the participation regarding health promotion activities and emergency response such as referral of pregnant women as well as other emergency cases.

Participants were leaders from Karen Department of Health and Welfare from central, District and Township levels, Village health committee and others key leaders from the villages, about 100 people.

VHC meeting group photo

During the meeting/workshop, participants were divided into groups trying to identify what are the common diseases happen in their area and where do they refer patients for emergency cases.

They also worked out the benefits they received by organizing Village Health Committee and the challenges they faced in their work. In addition, participants were asked to provide the feedback and suggestion in order to operate the Village Health Committee more effectively.

According to the groups’ work, the most common diseases happening in their areas are respiration tract infection, malaria, dengue, gastritis, hypertension, hypotension, diabetes mellitus, arthritis and diarrhea.

Group discussion during VHCs meeting

For emergency cases, usually they refer the patients to Kawkareik hospital, Hpa-An hospital, Mawlamyine hospital, Myawwaddy hospital, Mae Sot General hospital as well as Mae Tao Clinic. Medical treatment costs in Government hospitals and Mae Sot general hospital are very expensive. The average cost for normal delivery are around 300,000 kyat and 500,000 kyat for caesarean.

The treatment cost for general diseases are different depending on different diseases and severity of the diseases. Medical treatment at Mae Tao Clinic is free of charge, however transportation costs for the patient are not provided.

Villagers are divided into three groups which are poor, medium and rich. The estimated average of the rich people are 14 percent, medium are 42 percent and poor are 44 percent respectively.

Getting to know each other

Feedback from the Village Health Committee suggested that KDHW needs to provide adequate medicines for the clinics, increase health education activities to the villagers, provide better health care especially for mothers and children and organize monitoring and evaluation activities.

They also suggested that KDHW needs to appoint medical specialists as well as hire enough staff for Taw Nor teaching hospital. Moreover, they recommended that fundraising activities are required for patient referral and ambulance bus for emergency cases, which are not affordable with the KDHW current situation.

 


Updated Policy for Humanitarian Assistance (June 2014) available

12 November 2014

KDHW is pleased to provide an updated KNU Policy for Humanitarian Assistance (June 2014) in Karen, English and Burmese languages.   See the Policy Statements page.


New 2013 Policy Statements and 2011 Annual Report available

21 May 2013

KDHW is pleased to provide an updated Health and Welfare Policy (Feb 2013) in Karen, English and Burmese languages.  A new KNU Policy on Humanitarian Operation in Ceasefire Zones (March 2013) is available in Burmese and English languages.   See the Policy Statements page.

The KDHW 2011 Annual Report is now available online.  See the Annual Reports page.

 

 

 


New Quality Improvement Team Visit Dweloe Township

9 August 2012

The quality improvement (QI) program has been recently created to improve the skills of health workers in the clinics. The team has six members including 2 men and 4 women. Three people went to visit Dweloe township to check on quality, review logbooks, collect surveys.  They also observed and treated patients according to BBG guidelines. Three conditions were the focus: diarrhea, malaria and acute respiratory infection.

walking through the jungle

carrying heavy load

On half way of the journey

Muddy trip

resting after a long way of hiking

During the training

using stick for climbing mountain

slippery route

caught up mud all over the body

A few more distance to Day Pa No village

Arriving in Dad Pa No village


KDHW Web Site – Major Update

30 June 2012

LINK TO ENGLISH

English version

Dear Friends and Partners,

We are pleased to let you know the KDHW web site has been updated in early 2012 with the latest information on our programs and partners. This is first major update we have completed over the past two years. Pages have been added for Gender Based Violence, Lymphatic Filariasis, Targeted Feeding and Vitamin A and Deworming. See the PROGRAMS link at the top of the page or the sidebar listing of all programs.

You can now FOLLOW the KDHW web site to receive news alerts by email. This feature alerts you when to check for changes to the web site. Simply register by clicking the FOLLOW button on the top right of the page and then confirming the link you receive in your email.

We have also added a comment form on the About page so you can contact us directly.

Thank you for your interest and support.

Karen Department of Health and Welfare


MRE Vocational Training and Learning New Skills

31 January 2012

Landmines continue to cause injuries and death for people who live in eastern Burma. Villagers are maimed, injured and a signifiant percentage of those who are injured are fatally wounded. Those who survive no longer have the means to support themselves and their families.

The second workshop for vocational training for land mine amputees was recently held.  The training has four teaching aims:

  • make cement blocks
  • use stones for construction – create a wall
  • create flat surface using natural stone
  • how make a water tank using cement blocks including finishing the surface with mortar

Most victims were farmers and are not able to continue to do agricultural work after their injuries.

Trainees learn to make cement blocks

Preparing to make a straight wall

The first aim has been achieved for most of the trainees.  Additional workshops will be conducted to assess what is feasible for the other objectives.

Further training in business skills and start up funding are also needed to assist victims to start a business and a new way to earn income.